RPI alumni

Posted by Jenifer Monger on October 24, 2014
Political Strategy  In 1900 the United States was planning for a Nicaraguan canal. Meanwhile, the French were desperate to sell their Panama Canal Zone rights to the U.S. for $109,000,000. The U.S deemed the price too high and continued with their decision for a Nicaraguan canal.
Posted by Jenifer Monger on September 23, 2014
The construction of the Panama Canal begins with the French. In 1875, while the United States was conducting surveys across Mexico and Nicaragua, trying to find the right canal route, France became very active and ambitious, eager to make their mark. The French spirit had been so greatly aroused by Ferdinand de Lesseps’s completion of the Suez Canal in 1869, that France decided to take the lead and attempt to conquer the Isthmus of Panama. Again, RPI Engineers were involved, in varying capacities.
Posted by John Dojka on February 12, 2014
The construction of the Main Building in 1864 marked the beginning of the steady expansion of Rensselaer’s campus up the hill on Troy’s eastern edge. There were two exceptions: the Gymnasium (the subject of our December 3 post) built just below the Main Building in 1887 and the lesser known Alumni Building erected on Second Street next to the Troy Savings Bank in 1893.
Posted by Amy the Archivist on May 5, 2011
Julius Skilton In remembrance of Cinco de Mayo, I thought I would share an interesting RPI connection to the end of the French occupation of Mexico. Julius A.
Posted by Amy the Archivist on December 16, 2010
Visitors to the Archives often remark that we have a lot of cool stuff.  I agree!  There are periods of time, however, when I have to deal with more mundane tasks and the 'cool stuff' is very much in my periphery.  I was having a rather blaisé day this week selecting photographs of individuals to scan and add to our image database.  The last folder in the
Posted by Amy the Archivist on September 30, 2010
The Class of 1838 included some rather notable alumni.  Two of them are in the Alumni Hall of Fame and several more are worthy candidates.  When I read over the accomplishments of these alums, I'm amazed at their ambition.  Ezra Carr, for instance, had an astounding resume.  Shortly after obtaining his
Posted by Amy the Archivist on September 22, 2010
The first civil engineering graduates pursued a variety of careers.  In addition to the obvious careers in railroad or bridge engineering, some were lawyers, some doctors, and a couple were even men of the cloth.  Fletcher Hawley was one of those men.  Fletcher was a career student for a while, a
Posted by John Dojka on September 14, 2010
The first civil engineers were travelers.  Many of them went far and wide to engage in their work.  This may not seem like a big deal in modern times, but when you think about the means of travel in the mid-nineteenth century; it's quite amazing.  These men were creating the next best mode of transportation -- railroads.  While much of this work was in progress in the United States, other countries were also investing in this transportation infrastructure.  Some of the first U.S.
Posted by John Dojka on September 1, 2010
This is the first installment in a series of profiles on the first civil engineering graduates at RPI.  The very first civil engineering degree was awarded by the Rensselaer Institute in 1835.  Among the first degree recipients, was a guy named Amos Westcott.  Westcott never practiced civil engineering; he taught chemistry for a few years and then entered medical school.  He obtained an M.D.
Posted by John Dojka on October 2, 2009
It's busy here on campus with Reunion & Homecoming in full swing. Here are a few old reunion photographs to mark the occasion. Enjoy!
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