Compulsory Physical Education

In the previous post, I noted that the opening of the ’87 Gymnasium marked a new focus on physical education at Rensselaer.  The effort to acquire appropriate fitness facilities had been largely student driven up to this point.  Students chronically complained about the lack of athletic venues and gym facilities on campus.  In 1912, the administration, led by Palmer Ricketts, took up the charge to provide physical education for all students.  Many colleges began to incorporate physical education into the curriculum during this time.  The first professor of hygiene and physical education at Rensselaer was appointed in 1912.  W.C. Batchelor was appointed as physical director in 1915.  He supervised the compulsory health and physical education program for freshmen.  This program, which included gymnasium classes and a hygiene class, was first instituted in the fall of 1916.  “All members of Division D (first year students), who are not excused on account of physical disability, are required to take exercise, either in the Gymnasium or on the Athletic Field, throughout the scholastic year.”  [1916 Course Catalog]   Lockers and towels were provided to each student and the rules governing them were printed in the student handbook.

Don’t put a dirty, damp towel in your locker, get a clean one every time you use the showers.  The towels don’t cost you anything, the Institute takes care of having them laundered.  The towel is not allowed to be taken out of the Gym.  Don’t take advantage of the Institute by trying to collect towels.

Although physical education was required, the administration was quick to point out that it was merely one small part of the student’s education.  “The Institute is not an ‘athletic institution,’ and the trustees and faculty do not intend to permit athletics to absorb the time, energy, and interest of its students.” [1926 Course Catalog]

Beginning in 1938, physical education was required for both freshmen and sophomores, five times in two weeks.  Students who could not pass a swim test had to take swim lessons for one semester.  This requirement remained in place for many years, though eventually the requirements could be fulfilled at any point during the four year course.  According to the 1971 catalog: “to complete the requirement for physical education, students must demonstrate proficiency through testing in six areas – physical fitness, swimming and four recreational lifetime activities, two indoor and two outdoor.”  Varsity athletes and sports club members could get PE credit for their participation.  Physical education was not required for female students until 1973.

Physical education requirements were eliminated in 1995.  From what I’ve read, students were happy to be relieved of the obligation.

Share
This entry was posted in Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute History and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Compulsory Physical Education

  1. Bill Duggan says:

    Once upon a time the RPI sports teams were known as the “Bachelors”, which I always thought was a reference to the dominant gender on campus. Did this actually refer to Professor Batchelor?

    By the way, I enjoyed doing PE as an undergrad. I had Jim Salfi, the hockey coach at the time, as the instructor for bowling in the Union bowling alley.

    I also remember the boys having to take the swim test in the ’87 gym pool, bathing suits optional. The girls took the test separately, and it may have been optional for them.

    I took my son to the Admissions Visiting Day last week – the facilities are a lot different than they were back in the 70’s.

  2. Bob Josef says:

    Personally, I’m glad they eliminated the requirement. Most P.E. classes were “taught” by the atheletic coaches, who seemed to hate the obligation — it wasn’t their “real” job. The only P.E. class that had an instructor who seemed to care was a Tai Chi class taught by a SUNY Albany grad student. I’m sure the coaches were quite happy to get back to just coaching!

  3. Alyssa says:

    My dad mentioned being able to submit his ski lift tickets as proof of doing PE back in the 70s. Not sure what he did during the (admittedly few) non-snowy months of the academic year!!

  4. James Williams says:

    I am trying to remember the swimming and running requirements the Class of 1977 had to pass in 1973…would be interesting to see how many of us could still do it! I thought one had to swim the length of the pool and make one dive from 10 feet, and to run 1.5 miles in 18 minutes. I think my time in the Rensselaer Fencing Club and on the Wrestling Team counted.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *